Meet the faces behind the names at emilymorrowhome.com

 

Emily Morrow Home began with a love story…a life-long love for design that grew into a profession. After almost thirty years of practicing interior design, thirteen of which was directing Shaw Industries’ color, style and design development, I have recently entered a new chapter of life and launched a new enterprise, Emily Morrow Home, a collection of products inspired by my life and love.

I am most passionate about designing unique products that are not found in commodity retailers…inspired by travels to the most beautiful and amazing places on earth.  The Emily Morrow Home Collection is not only about making our lives and homes more beautiful, it’s also about making the process of designing the home a pleasure while avoiding the usual pitfalls. That is why I sell through professionals, people with proven ability and craftsmanship who stand behind their work, as do I.  Each product within the initial hardwood collection is inspired and designed to bring the world’s most beautiful visuals home to you, whether it’s Napa Valley or the Pacific Coast highway.  As with any well-executed design project, one should always begin with the floors…the most beautiful “canvas” from which a home filled with personal expressions of style can emerge.

Emily Morrow Home invites you to get inspired. Combining a love of travel and art, Emily Morrow has transformed her passions into unique and charming home interior design. You’ll find collections influenced by the most beautiful aesthetics the world has to offer. Add a pop of culture to your home or reinvent it entirely. The Emily Morrow Home Collection can help you do both.

Emily

                                         

 

To read more inspo, click here

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MEET THE FACES AND NAMES

BEHIND OUR PRODUCTS…

 

The Finkells DCN photo
By my side is the manufacturer of my line of premium hardwood floors, Don Finkell…who is the love of my life … my husband. If it weren’t for him, I would not have been inspired to create this line of products, which he has touted as being “the most beautiful products of my entire career”. Don is the CEO of American OEM and his team is composed of some of the industry’s greatest talents, including Don’s daughter Allie.

 

 

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Our boards really are up to 8 feet in length. Meet my daughter Mary Morrow who, even in heels, is still significantly shorter than our massively long planks.

 

 

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Hunt Broyhill of Aria Designs shows just how comfortable the seating and cushions truly are during a hectic High Point Market. He and the team at Aria Designs have created timeless pieces of upholstery that are not only luxuriously comfortable, but also durable…and guess what? They are made in Lenoir, North Carolina.

 

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This particular sectional at Aria is one of my personal favorites due to the fact that this is covered in “Performance” grade fabric that actually repels dirt, spills and so much more. For my family and our doggy Donatella the truffle dog (see below), it is essential to have seating that we don’t have to constantly worry about spilling or soiling.
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Donatella the Truffle Dog, our official “tough tester” for our incredibly durable scratch resistant premium hardwood floors and the performance fabrics on the upholstery.

 

 

 

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Brownlee Currey of Currey and Company and Emily Morrow Finkell at the Currey and Company recently expanded High Point Showroom. Launching with EmilyMorrowHome is also the gorgeous lighting and accessories from Currey and Company.

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My husband Don Finkell and my two children, Mary and William Morrow helped me celebrate my landmark 50th birthday. Join me in celebrating 50 years of “life” as well as 15 years of being cancer free. A portion of our profits from emilymorrowhome.com will go to the Kiker Morrow Finkell Cancer Care Foundation in celebration of defeating breast cancer 15 years ago.

FAQ

Q: How do I know how much hardwood flooring to order?

A: First have a professional installer measure your space for the square footage requirements as well as the recommended percentage of extra material for making any unusual cuts, typically that is around 8%-10% extra.

Q: How to find a certified hardwood installer?

A: http://woodfloors.org/certified-professional-search.aspx

Q: Why is Emily Morrow Home Hardwood better than all the others?

A: The wood is “premium,” and not just in name. Overall you get more wood, seven cross-plies of hardwood make it incredibly versatile and more dimensionally stable; thicker than the others at 5/8 inch thickness as compared to lesser 1/2 inch engineered products. Design is anything but ordinary; it is carefully researched to resemble looks that are timeless and yet contemporary; and did I mention it is sourced from 100 percent US responsibly forested hardwood? When you walk across these floors, they sound as if they’ve been there forever, making them authentic and luxurious…and they add lifelong value and charm to your home. Most importantly, we have the best manufacturer in the USA and arguable in the world, steeped in a long and proven history of manufacturing excellence as well as forestry and environmental stewardship, American OEM which is located just west of Nashville, Tennessee.

Q: Why American made?

A: When you buy our American-made hardwood, you can be sure that you’re buying the best flooring possible at a value unmatched in the industry. You’re also investing in an American industry, and an all-American legacy.

That’s because buying American means more than simply buying hardwood products finished in the USA. It means buying exceptional value, precision quality products that were grown, harvested, designed and constructed in America, by skilled American laborers with pride for their craft. Today, American-made hardwood flooring is making a comeback for those very reasons – people, tradition and quality you can rely on.

Q: Why Engineered Hardwood?

A: At Emily Morrow Home, we believe in eliminating the traditional waste associated with solid wood floor production of slow growth species, while still finding a way to showcase their incredible beauty. To do this, we use a mixture of woods to create a much more advanced flooring option – the engineered floor. Unlike a solid wood floor, an engineered (multi-ply) floor consists of at least two types of different wood products adhered together. This means that the top layer (what you see when installed) can be a highly desired species of wood, like oak, while the bottom substrate layer (what you don’t see when installed) can be those fast-growing tree species. Manufacturing floors in this way allows us to more sustainably harvest trees and produce more high quality floors with the same robust and luxurious feeling of solid wood flooring within the thickness of that top layer. When installed properly, an engineered floor is virtually indistinguishable from a solid floor – the very same look and feel with the added stability in a far more environmentally-conscious way.

Q: Do the Currey & Company chandeliers come with a canopy (ceiling plate)?

A: All Currey & Company chandeliers come with a canopy and chain that is finished to match the chandelier.

Q: Can I get extra chain for a Currey & Company chandelier?

A: Extra chains are available for chandeliers and comes packaged in 3′ or 8′ lengths. These lengths match the standard length of the chain provided with the chandelier.

Q: How do I know the correct size of a chandelier for a dining table?

A: A general guideline is to choose a chandelier that has a diameter equal to one-half the width of the table. The general appearance of the chandelier must be taken into account, too; that is, if it is a light airy piece it may be slightly larger than the standard.

Q: How low should a chandelier be hung over a dining table?

A: Generally there should be 30″ between the bottom of the chandelier and the top of the table in a room with an 8′ ceiling. If the ceiling is higher, the distance between the bottom of the fixture and the table should increase slightly. Remember that the chandelier should provide light for the table, but not be so low as to block anyone’s line of vision when they are sitting at the table.

Q: What guidelines should I follow in choosing a chandelier for a foyer or other room?

A: Add the room dimensions together. If the room is 14′ by 16′, add 14 + 16. The answer is 30, which means that your chandelier should be approximately 30″ in diameter. Again, remember that other factors such as the height of the ceiling may influence the proper size.

Q: How high should I hang a wall sconce?

A: Generally, sconces should be placed on a wall 60″ from the floor.

American OEM Information

Installation Instructions

Floating Installation Disclaimer

Care & Maintenance

Side Bend Technical Bulletin

Warranty Information

Aria Designs Warranty

American OEM Warranty
For more insights on design trends and hardwood flooring…

Design Spectator: Do you believe in magic? Great ideas that come to life are “magic”

Emily Morrow Finkell, DESIGN SPECTATOR:
Do you believe in magic?
Great ideas that come to life are “magic”…

http://bt.e-ditionsbyfry.com/publication/?i=407413#{“issue_id”:407413,”page”:35}

As someone who considers myself “mature”, certainly well beyond believing in mythical creatures, the Easter bunny and magic tricks, I admittedly have become a believer in a kind of “magic”…not the kind that where rabbits come out of hats but a more refined kind of magic, the “magic” that happen when the greatest talents in the design world create something we all see and recognize as something beyond the ordinary. It takes that certain something, je ne sais quoi, to come up with a “winner” and ever more of that certain something to have a successfully selling product.

Over my twenty-something years of meeting and or collaborating with the very best in the design world, there’s one common thread that I have finally deduced that they all share. I’ve met some greats: Kevin Sharkey, as in Senior Vice President and Executive Editorial Director, Decorating, and Executive Creative Director, Merchandising for Martha Stewart Living Omnimedia, Inc.; Alexa Hampton, owner and designer of Mark Hampton Design, LLC and designer of a variety of licensed products under her own name; and those design talents you might not have heard of but certainly know their work in the many items we use daily without even thinking. Each one carry with them an experience and wisdom that comes from working both hard and smart, those who have been born with a natural gift, an ability or an eye, with a passion and a drive to create something beautiful. These are the “magicians” of our world, the artists, interior designers, fashion designers and product designers. They bring beauty out of nothing one can see with the naked eye and make it into something indispensible to us as consumers. Walking through the various expos, furniture and design shows as often as I do, I’ve seen with my own eyes the incredibly brilliant outcomes of the magic from some very talented design minds. Some very great products and designs are licensed under very well known names, assuring the consumers that the credibility and integrity of the designs are at their best ,while others were conceived by unnamed product designers for the licensees, and yet others are the result of companies who mine for design either by outside consultants or their own internal product design teams. Regardless of the method, the outcome is always exciting to see.

 

During this spring’s High Point Market, I was fortunate enough to meet and talk with Alexander Julian as he spoke about his life’s work and career in designing fashion for menswear, womenswear as well as home furnishings, specifically Universal Furniture. Alex, as he is known by his friends and colleagues, said he always wanted to be an artist but he said his hands could not draw the colors and patterns that were in his head, so he turned to product design to explain it… it is commercial art…”art is my teacher”. The world between fashion and furnishings is interesting from his perspective. He said that he looks at many of the same things for inspiration, nature, art, texture, color, how it feels et cetera, “but the advantages of furniture is that it’s not gender specific, one must appeal to women and men simultaneously… How you feather your nest…fashion is the common denominator, it’s in the simple details, button for example” as he gestures towards the console table with tortoise shell button inspired pulls. 

After all the questions and answers were over, I overheard one of the designers say as they were leaving the meeting room, “Wow, he actually didn’t tell us anything tangible about how he does what he does…but he certainly does it well. Do you think he knows, really what it is that he does, what it is that makes him special and sought after?” This question caused me to think about the mystery of the creative process and the genius of great design. It is something that can only be described as “magic”.

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A vignette within Universal Furniture’s massive 118,000 square foot design showroom in High Point, North Carolina
What does it take to make magic? It requires years of study, observation, trials as well as failures, and most importantly, it requires successes with the right combinations of people and partners. It also reminded me of the incredibly hardworking and talented design mavens who work for the companies that pay license fees to “celebrity designers”, many of whom I know personally and respect them greatly. Currey and Company as well as Universal Furniture are two that immediately come to mind. Janine Wagers, Creative Director at Universal Furniture, was frequently lauded by Alexander Julian for her amazing design work within their endlessly stunning vignettes and rooms at High Point. Currey and Company’s Brownlee Currey and Curtis Adams, Creative Director also showcased newest looks under the Bunny Williams name. All of their creations,  collaboratively with Bunny Williams  or solely by their own internal designers, the freshness and inspiration is immediately apparent to anyone who follows design. 

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Brownlee Currey of Currey and Company explains the newest trends in lighting and accessories, all very fashion and jewelry inspired.
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Emily Morrow Finkell (left) and Janine Wagers (right) Creative Director for Universal Furniture.

Success comes from an idea that has been brought to life by lots of nurturing, endless support that has been reworked, tweaked, financially backed by someone who’s willing to go to bat for it, go the distance for it and most importantly that certain someone who’s willing to buy it, buy enough of it to make sense on a financial level. This seems so simple from afar. If you’ve seen the movie “Joy”, the story of the miracle mop by Joy Mangano, it’s the hollywood version of how someone took their great idea to market. In the floor covering, fashion or furniture industry, one can’t just operate in “onesie-twosie” sized successes, but regularly in bulk, rolls, pallets and truck loads in order to succeed and stay in business. We’re in exciting times with our improving economy, fewer regulations and less red tape for new businesses and entrepreneurs to be able to flourish. It’s hard to believe that the first the first generation of Apple’s iPhone was announced on January 9, 2007. Now we can’t imagine our lives without a smart phone. What new products, new categories will be see come to life in the next few years that we will soon wonder how we could ever live without?

 

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Bunny Williams debuts her lighting, furniture and accessories at Currey and Company this spring High Point Market 2017.
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Currey and Company High Point Spring Market 2017
 

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Currey and Company light fixture new for Spring 2017.

Style in a World of Endless Choices NWFA Magazine June 1, 2017 Emily Morrow Finkell

Style in a World of Endless Choices

 

In a world where consumers can find literally every option ever considered, where does a flooring professional start when trying to identify a style for your customer’s floor if they haven’t already done so?

As an interior designer who is now entering my fifth decade, I’ve fine-tuned some techniques that have helped clients discern what they like over the years, as well as create their very own “look.” This is essential for most people unless they’re one of those individuals who strives for a cookie-cutter interior. But more often than not, homeowners want to have a home that reflects who they are, as well as their passions and interests. Pulling together the “likes” into something that has a cohesive and fluid effect on the eyes is what makes design a challenge.

You may ask, “How do I begin?”

The first step is one of the oldest tricks in the book, but it still works. Historically, I would ask clients to flip through the pages of magazines and catalogs and tear out or mark certain pages, noting the specifics of what they liked. The modern day approach to doing this same thing is utilized by millions of people, creating boards and collections online using apps such as Pinterest and HOUZZ.

These sites in particular provide your customer with the opportunity to see projects and homes from all around the world and share images with you as they look for flooring recommendations that match their style. If a picture is worth a thousand words, then an idea board is worth a gazillion words, especially when trying to articulate a look or style that’s hard to define.

Today’s design styles are a hybrid mixture of various genres mixed and updated to the point of an all-new look. Take the midcentury modern look as an example. It has morphed into an updated livable version, having mass appeal to many demographic groups.

If you don’t have an eye for design yourself, once your client has curated the looks into idea boards, share them with someone you trust who has a great design eye to give you some feedback, including manufacturers and distributors you work with closely. It is beneficial to bring in someone with a fresh perspective at various points in the design process who can help you see more than just the floor, but also the whole picture of an interior. It might be that a certain color emerges in the mix, or a design motif, like palm leaves for example. Then you can begin to tie together the floor with your clients’ overall scheme.

Flooring is often the last decision people make when working on a renovation project, but my recommendation is that it be the first consideration. If you begin a project with a firm foundation, in this instance, a well-chosen floor, then all the other decisions become easier. Hardwood floors are still considered the “premium” flooring material even in a world of waterproof and wood lookalikes. Like a beautiful diamond among cubic zirconia, there’s nothing quite like the real thing – the look, the feel, and even the sound is unique as you walk across real hardwood floors.

Consider this: There are endless options of hardwood floors out there to choose from and what a customer brings into their home matters not only for the years of enjoyment and the value added to the home, but also in terms of keeping the materials “healthy” to live on. Sticking with responsibly sourced and responsibly made hardwood floors is the safest way to ensure you’re utilizing materials that not only meet, but exceed, any and all governmentally required standards.

Here are other suggestions that can be shared with your customers who look to you for advice on bringing their overall design plan to life:

Use layers
Layering with a mixture of old and new objects is essential. None of these pieces have to be expensive, but should be chosen carefully and thoughtfully. Finding a “happiness meter” for the level of color and pattern used is a lot like preparing a delicious menu for dinner. You never want too many salty, spicy, or sweet things all at once, but rather a balanced variety of tastes that complement one another, not compete for the tastebuds’ pleasure. The human eye reads an interior in much the same way as we enjoy a good meal.

Don’t be afraid of color
Color is an effective and also an inexpensive way to guide the eye throughout an interior from the moment you walk in the door as well as the progression through to the innermost spaces. The color you wear the most is typically the color you feel the best in. Does the customer own an article of clothing that they absolutely love for its color or pattern? That can be a clue as to what color they should introduce as a starting point. Personally, I love black, but that certainly doesn’t mean that I have an all-black home. I do however use black lamp shades and accessories that are good for bringing in a little drama and definition to a space. I also have a favorite scarf with varying shades of blue that looks similar to some blue and white porcelain vases that I once had in storage. Suffice it to say, out of storage they came, and the blue and white porcelain pieces became the common thread from which my design scheme grew.

Find a balance
If the customer has some art or a collection of special items they would like to showcase, recommend keeping the walls as “quiet” as possible so they don’t overpower the space. Light gray, creamy off-white, or light taupe walls are perfect backdrops for bringing in furniture, art, or accessories that are bold either in color or pattern.

Don’t forget adjacent spaces
If there’s a specific upholstery or drapery fabric they plan on using, advise choosing two or three colors from that fabric, which can become the key colors for the adjacent spaces. The adjacent spaces matter a great deal in maintaining a sense of harmony between the rooms. How a customer feels as they transition from the foyer to the family room to the kitchen is important. Most homes feature an open floor plan and offer a particular challenge as to where and when the homeowner should transition to a different paint color. There are coordinating paint schemes offered by many of the nationally known paint companies that allow you to select colors that are specifically chosen to work beautifully together. If colors don’t work well together, even a design rookie can sense something is off, but when it’s right, you almost don’t notice anything; it just feels right.

Know your focal point
Identify the room’s focal point, the dominant area, perhaps architecturally, by placement of bold color or a large piece of furniture. It’s important to keep that in mind all along; don’t try to fight it, but use it as an advantage. We have minimalist as well as maximalist styles, battling for our attention. If you’re one who believes less is more, but bring something home from every special vacation as a memento, then you’re going to have a challenge in balancing your two conflicting worlds. There are endless ways to bring the two into harmony.

In closing, if the customer loves something enough, it’s possible to find a way to make it work. It’s all in the mixing, not in the matching, that makes a house a home.

Emily Morrow Finkell is an interior designer and CEO of EF Floors & Design, LLC in Dalton, a provider of hardwood floors and home furnishings, and NWFA design contributor. She can be reached at kikermorrow@gmail.com.

 

 

 

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